The M-Test (Meridian Test) Procedure

The following article is excerpted from the M-Test (Meridian Test) Digest (translated and edited in English by Shinjiro Kanazawa) which is a summary of two books on the M-Test (Meridian Test) written by Yoshito Mukaino, M.D. Before you read the following article, you should read the article "M-Test (Meridian Test) - Our New Weapon : Try it, it works!!!" written by Mr. Kanazawa in this web site. This article may help you to grasp the idea of the M-Test (Meridian Test). Yoshito Mukaino May 5th. 2001

The M-Test (Meridian Test) Procedure

I designed a loading test that confirms restriction of movement of meridians. This test enables us to find easily, swiftly and surely the meridians that we have to treat. Moreover, the test can be used to evaluate the result of the treatment.

Anterior Meridians and Loads of Movement

1: Lung-Large Intestine Meridians and Movement (Illustration 1)

Lung and Large Intestine meridians relate to the movement of the anterior upper body. Movement of the neck (Illustration 1: l,2,3) extends the anterior neck and chest. The movement of shoulder and elbow (Illustration 1: 5,6,7,8) extends the anterior shoulder and elbow. The movement of the wrist (Illustration 1: 4) extends the anterior (Radial side) wrist.

Illustration 1: Lung-Large Intestine Meridians and Movement
Illustration 1: Lung-Large Intestine Meridians and Movement

2: Spleen-Stomach Meridians and Movement (Illustration 2)

Spleen and Stomach meridians relate to the movement of the Extension of the anterior lower extremities. Lumbar extension (Illustration 2: 1), the extension of a hip joint and flexion of the knee in the prone position (Illustration 2: 2 and 3), and the plantar flexion of the ankle joint (Illustration 2: 4) extend the anterior lower extremities. Any of these movement extends Spleen and Stomach meridians, which relate each other as an Internal-External meridian couple.

Illustration 2: pleen-Stomach Meridians and Movement
Illustration 2: pleen-Stomach Meridians and Movement

3: Ren Meridian and Movement (Illustration 1 and 2)

Ren meridian is related to all movement that extend Lung, Large Intestine, Spleen and Stomach meridians.

Posterior Meridians and Loads of Movement

1: Heart-Small Intestine Meridians and Movement (Illustration 3)

Heart and Small Intestine meridians relate to movement of extending the posterior upper torso. The flexion of the neck (Illustration 3: 1 and 2) extends the posterior neck and shoulder. Movement of the shoulder and elbow (Illustration 3: 4, 5, 6 and 7) extends the posterior shoulder and elbow. Movement of wrist (Illustration 3: 3) extends the posterior wrist. Any of those movements extends Heart and Small lntestine meridians, which relate to each other as an Internal-External meridian couple.

Illustration 3: Heart-Small Intestine Meridians and Movement
Illustration 3: Heart-Small Intestine Meridians and Movement

2: Kidney-Bladder Meridians and Movement (Illustration 4)

Kidney and Bladder meridians relate to extension movement of the posterior lower body. Kidney meridian runs the posterior extremities and the anterior torso. Thus movement that extends Kidney meridian differs in the lower extremities and in the torso. Even though, movement of the lower extremities affects whole Kidney meridian.
Flexion of the hip joint (Illustration 4: l), flexion of hip joint and knee joint in the supine position (Illustration 4: 2 and 3) and dorsiflexion of foot (Illustration 4: 4) extend the posterior body. Any of those movements extends Kidney and Bladder meridians, which are related as an Interior-Exterior meridian couple.

Illustration 4: Kidney-Bladder Meridians and Movement
Illustration 4: Kidney-Bladder Meridians and Movement

3: Du Meridian and Movement (Illustration 3 and 4)

Du meridian is related to all the extension movements of Heart- Small Intestine and Kidney-Bladder meridians.

Lateral-Medial Meridians and Loads of Movement

1: Pericardium-San Jiao Meridians and Movement (Illustration 5)

Pericardium and San Jiao meridians relate to extension movement of the lateral upper torso. Movement of the shoulder and elbow (Illustration 5: 2,3 and 4) extend the lateral shoulder and elbow. The palmar flexion of the wrist (Illustration 5: 5) extends the lateral wrist. Any of those movements extends San Jiao meridian. Movement of the shoulder and elbow (Illustration 5: 6,7, and 8) extend the medial shoulder (axilla) and the medial elbow. The dorsal flexion of the wrist (Illustration 5: 9) extends the medial wrist."@Any of those movement extends Pericardium meridian.
Lateroflexion of the neck (Illustration 5: 1) is affected by Pericardium and San Jiao meridians, which relate to each other as an Interior-Exterior meridian couple.

Illustration 5: Pericardium-San Jiao Meridians and Movement
Illustration 5: Pericardium-San Jiao Meridians and Movement

2: Liver-Gallbladder Meridians and Movement (Illustration 6)

Liver and Gallbladder meridians relate to extension movement of the both lateral and medial side of body, mainly the lower body. Movement of the hip, knee and ankle joints (Illustration 6: 3 and 7) extend the lateral side of hip, knee and ankle.
Any of these movement extend Gallbladder meridian.
Another movement of the hip, knee and ankle joints (Illustration 6: 4 and 6) extend the medial side of the hip, knee and ankle.
Any of these movement extends Liver meridian.
The movements as shown in Illustration 6: 1, 2, and 5 increase the extension load on both of Liver and Gallbladder meridians.

Illustration 6: Liver-Gallbladder Meridians and Movement
Illustration 6: Liver-Gallbladder Meridians and Movement

3: Dai Meridian and Movement (Illustration 5 and 6)

Dai meridian is a transverse axis that governs Pericardium, San Jiao, Liver and Gallbladder meridians, which are distributed in the lateral and medial sides of the body. Dai meridian relates to all extension movements of Pericardium, San Jiao, Liver and Gallbladder meridians.

Procedure of the M-Test (Meridian Test) (Illustration 7)

Illustration 7: Procedure of the M-Test (Meridian Test)
Illustration 7: Procedure of the M-Test (Meridian Test)